Turning Data into Development: UWP’s Pre-Site Assessment

It wasn’t all that long ago that stacks of paper were piling up here in the Ugandan Water Project office. By the ream, our staff shuffled and sorted forms transported to Rochester, NY all the way from Kampala, Uganda. We piled and unpiled. We filed and un-filed. In vibrant colors, we scribbled notes in the margins of our red-dirt stained stacks, trying to make sense of the data we were amassing. Impact surveys. Installation reports. Pre-site assessments. We were collecting all sorts of data in the field and bringing it home with us! Firmly stationed at the forefront of our Ugandan Water Project workflow is our Pre-Site Assessment survey. This assessment plays a particularly important role in evaluating the opportunity for UWP work at potential project sites. We seek to prioritize sites crippled by the most severe and urgent needs. In order to objectively identify these high priority sites, we employ a scoring system in the Pre-Site survey. In the paper version of our Pre-Site Assessment, we asked a set of questions with weighted scores assigned to each response. After completing the paper form of the Pre-Site Assessment, a total score was then hand-tallied into a single number. This value offered a quantitative value that correlates to the level of need at a particular site. While this output lacked meaning on its own, it could be easily compared to the scores calculated for other potential project sites. While this methodology made objectively comparing sites based on need possible, we were still left with a problem.  Our data and scores were held captive in stacks of paper. While we had an overflowing spring of...

Doroth’s Story

Nante Doroth, affectionately known as Dorothy to most of the UWP staff, works as our Office Secretary in our Ugandan office.  Her faithful dedication to our organization is one we don’t take lightly, so we wanted to share a piece of her story with you.  Meet Doroth! My Personal Story How I came to work with UWP: During my senior six school break, while wondering where tuition to push me through the university level was to come from, I got enough time to visit some of my relatives and during that time I came to know that I had an aunt (sister to my late father) called Namaganda Beatrice Nsamba – a wife to pastor George William Nsamba and also the UWP Director UG Office at the time. This family welcomed me as a child of their own introduced me to many new things, one of which was to work as an assistant secretary of George’s church and volunteer with UWP in the UG Office to help keep records. That is how I came to UWP in 2011. When James Harrington, the UWP Executive Director, came back to Uganda in 2012, we had a little conversation with him for the first time and I was able to show him what I managed to do as a volunteer by that time such as making files for each project that was worked. From that time, James gave me the job, and since that time up to now I am working as the UWP Office Secretary UG. What I love about working with UWP: In this organization we are a family, the...