UWP Team #22 Now Open!

UWP Team #22 Now Open!

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR UWP TEAM #22! TENTATIVE DATES: February 5-18, 2017 COST: $3,500 – includes airfare, visa, housing, meals, in-country transportation, travel insurance, and project programs. APPLICATION DEADLINE:October 3, 2016 WHY GO?   Life-change happens in the context of genuine relationship.  That’s why we don’t just send resources to implement new water projects; we also send people…  people like YOU!  If you have a desire to go to Uganda, you also have the opportunity to represent and share your experience with those who Our team members are an active part of our organization while in Uganda.  You help build bridges between the US and Uganda, bringing sponsor stories to Ugandan communities and taking experience and a passion for advocacy back home.  You may find yourself doing any of the following: demonstrating Sawyer PointONE water filters, capturing the stories in photographs or through writing; participating in celebration services; public speaking; playing and teaching children; assisting staff in conducting community surveys; sharing music; teaching a variety of basic hygiene skills; basic repairs on project installations; listening, loving and laughing! People of all ages, differing personalities and skills, and with varying degrees of humanitarian work experience have been on our teams!  Each one of you offers something unique, and each experience offers a story that’s all your own. WHERE DO I START? 1) Visit the Go section of our website.  You’ll find additional trip information that will answer questions about the basics.  We would be happy to connect with you if you have additional questions.  Be sure to check out the rest of the website to get a feel for what UWP is all about! 2) Consider what is compelling you to go.  Maybe your personal faith or a commitment...

Turning Data into Development: UWP’s Pre-Site Assessment

It wasn’t all that long ago that stacks of paper were piling up here in the Ugandan Water Project office. By the ream, our staff shuffled and sorted forms transported to Rochester, NY all the way from Kampala, Uganda. We piled and unpiled. We filed and un-filed. In vibrant colors, we scribbled notes in the margins of our red-dirt stained stacks, trying to make sense of the data we were amassing. Impact surveys. Installation reports. Pre-site assessments. We were collecting all sorts of data in the field and bringing it home with us! Firmly stationed at the forefront of our Ugandan Water Project workflow is our Pre-Site Assessment survey. This assessment plays a particularly important role in evaluating the opportunity for UWP work at potential project sites. We seek to prioritize sites crippled by the most severe and urgent needs. In order to objectively identify these high priority sites, we employ a scoring system in the Pre-Site survey. In the paper version of our Pre-Site Assessment, we asked a set of questions with weighted scores assigned to each response. After completing the paper form of the Pre-Site Assessment, a total score was then hand-tallied into a single number. This value offered a quantitative value that correlates to the level of need at a particular site. While this output lacked meaning on its own, it could be easily compared to the scores calculated for other potential project sites. While this methodology made objectively comparing sites based on need possible, we were still left with a problem.  Our data and scores were held captive in stacks of paper. While we had an overflowing spring of...

Doroth’s Story

Nante Doroth, affectionately known as Dorothy to most of the UWP staff, works as our Office Secretary in our Ugandan office.  Her faithful dedication to our organization is one we don’t take lightly, so we wanted to share a piece of her story with you.  Meet Doroth! My Personal Story How I came to work with UWP: During my senior six school break, while wondering where tuition to push me through the university level was to come from, I got enough time to visit some of my relatives and during that time I came to know that I had an aunt (sister to my late father) called Namaganda Beatrice Nsamba – a wife to pastor George William Nsamba and also the UWP Director UG Office at the time. This family welcomed me as a child of their own introduced me to many new things, one of which was to work as an assistant secretary of George’s church and volunteer with UWP in the UG Office to help keep records. That is how I came to UWP in 2011. When James Harrington, the UWP Executive Director, came back to Uganda in 2012, we had a little conversation with him for the first time and I was able to show him what I managed to do as a volunteer by that time such as making files for each project that was worked. From that time, James gave me the job, and since that time up to now I am working as the UWP Office Secretary UG. What I love about working with UWP: In this organization we are a family, the...
Tanner’s Story: From Intern to Insider

Tanner’s Story: From Intern to Insider

In international development, there is a romanticism that comes with working in the field. There’s satisfaction in waking up to a golden African sunrise, in beholding the beautiful red dirt roads of Uganda. As a part of Team #18 in May 2014, I experienced life in Ugandan communities, standing shoulder to shoulder with amazing men, women, and children – and it shaped who I am, changed my worldview, and forced me to re-examine my values. Such fieldwork is critical in creating meaningful success in international development. It also happens to be the most visible facet. Such success, however, cannot be achieved without critical work on the back end. While there are no African sunrises or rolling red dirt roads in my internship, no photo shoots generating funding or emotional responses from friends and family, it is a story that I have been asked to share. In the business of charity, good intentions are not enough, helping can hurt, and charity can be toxic. It is humbling to know that, despite our best efforts to do good, we can be inflicting long-lasting harm without knowing it. For me, monitoring and evaluation (M&E) is an essential part of going beyond good intentions and avoiding these pitfalls. M&E supports both responsible giving and responsible receiving. It celebrates our best efforts and humbles us before our worst failures. For these reasons, I was elated when James Harrington, Executive Director of the Ugandan Water Project (UWP), expressed interest in an M&E program to help effectively provide communities in Uganda with safe drinking water. James proposed that I come on board as a summer intern to...
Eternal Memory

Eternal Memory

Eternal Memory (That we might never forget) My pretentiously sheltered experience is unable to escape the wrenching reality transposed before me through the medium of their iron-clad hearts, the bitter human precipitation that has engraved its memory upon their flesh, their countenances of leathery strength and turmoil, and their eyes which send a shrill scream to my impoverished soul, pleading with me to recognize the dreams which have become entrapped within the hoosegow of their desperation. – Christin Oliphant (Harrington) May 19, 1992...